Autumn

I love fall because of the moderate temperatures and the changing of colours. Here are some of what I captured – old and new. The first few locations are taken in Hamilton and it is known as the Waterfall Capital of the World. While I’ve only been to a handful, I hope to see more in the next few weeks while the weather is great. Many of these trails are located along the Bruce Trail which run about 900km from the Niagara Escarpment to Tobermory.

Tiffany Falls

Tiffany Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Tiffany Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Tiffany Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Tiffany Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Tiffany Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Devil’s Punch Bowl

Devil's Punch Bowl, Hamilton//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

<Devil's Punch Bowl, Hamilton//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Devil's Punch Bowl, Hamilton//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Albion Falls

Albion Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Albion Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Albion Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Albion Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Albion Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Albion Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Rattlesnake Point (Milton)

Rattlesnake Point, Bruce Trail//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Springridge Farm (Milton)

Fall Season at Springridge Farm//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Springridge Farm//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Springridge Farm Tractor Trailer Ride//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Springridge Farm Store//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Springridge Farm//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Chudleigh’s Farm (Milton)

A day at Chudleigh's Farm//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

A day at Chudleigh's Farm//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

A day at Chudleigh's Farm//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

A day at Chudleigh's Farm//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Tractor ride//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

A day at Chudleigh's Farm//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Riverwood Conservancy (Mississauga)

Red Maple Leaf, Riverwood Park//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Matsuri – Japanese Summer Festival 2016

During the summer when most people are not working during evenings and weekends, that’s when I start work. Whether freelance or for the company I work for, I work when people are available. So when I get a chance to catch a summer event or have time to hang out with friends, I appreciate the time off.

Here’s what I saw at Mississauga’s first Matsuri – Japanese Summer Festival:

Omikoshi
Matsuri - Japanese Summer Festival//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Nagata Shachu Taiko Drumming
Nagata Shachu//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Nagata Shachu//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Nagata Shachu//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Nagata Shachu//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Mayor Bonnie Crombie Addresses the crowd during 35th Sister City Anniversary Ceremony between Mississauga and Kariya
Mayor Bonnie Crombie addresses the crowd//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Breaking the Mirror Ceremony
Sake Wine Cask Breaking Ceremony
Sake Cask Breaking//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Shishimai – Traditional Japanese Lion Dance

Shishimai - Traditional Japanese Lion Dance//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Fuu-Wa Japanese Group Singers
Fuu-wa//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

J-pop: Niji no Conquistador
Niji no Conquistador - J Pop//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Mississauga Kendo Club
Mississauga Kendo Club//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Mississauga Kendo Club//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The Toronto Kimono Club
The Toronto Kimono Club//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The Toronto Kimono Club//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The Toronto Kimono Club//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

STORYTiME Contemporary Street Dance Performers
STORYTiME Contemporary: Street Dance Performance//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

STORYTiME Contemporary: Street Dance Performance and Workshop//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

TBC Buyo Group
TBC Buyo Group//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Kimono Fun Club & Others
Kimono Fun Club//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js
https://greceln.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post-new.php
Kimono Fun Club//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Kimono Fun Club//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Scenes from Point Pelee National Park

Revisiting Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Did I ever tell you how much I like going to Point Pelee?

I never really knew this place existed until, oddly enough, I played Hangman on the computer. The word Point Pelee kept coming up. It was an odd word and I never knew it existed. One day, curiosity got the better of me and I did more research on it.

Located in Ontario, it’s the southernmost point in Canada and lies just below the 42nd parallel. It is as far south as Rome, Northern Spain and the northern border of California. It is also known as the Carolinian Zone where the average temperature for the year is 8°C. As described on the official Parks Canada site, “Early scientists called this region the Carolinian zone. Now, it is more generally referred to as the eastern deciduous forest, except in Canada where the term Carolinian is still popular because of its southern flavour.” Considering the massive size of Canada, this zone is only a tiny fraction of the country. The reason it stays warmer than Laramie, Wyoming (which is considered the center of the continent and on the same parallel as Point Pelee) is because it is surrounded by large bodies of water that helps to maintain heat better. It serves as a migration center for birds in the spring and fall and plays host to 370 species of birds.

This year, I managed to make two trips to the park and only because I was working on location in nearby towns. With the three hour drive from where I live to get to Point Pelee, it’s difficult to make it there on its own, unless I make a weekend trip to the area. It just makes it more difficult for sunrise and sunset photography. The park does operate from 6:00am – 10:00pm in the summer and it does change depending on the time of year it is. As you can imagine, if I really wanted to, I’d have to make an effort to leave at 3:00am just to make it to the gate at sunrise. That is why when I did so, I appreciate being able to get the sunrise shots all the better.

Without further adieu, here’s what I captured in recent weeks:

Lookout Point
Lookout Point, Sunrise at Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Lookout Point, Sunrise at Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Lookout Point, Sunrise at Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Marsh Boardwalk
Marsh Boardwalk, Sunrise at Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Yellow Pond Lily (Spatterdock)
Yellow Pond Lily//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Revisiting Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Revisiting Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-

Revisiting Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Yellow Pond Lily//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Revisiting Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Revisiting Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Revisiting Point Pelee//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js